SAS Tutorial | Getting Started with SAS Enterprise Guide (Extended Version)

Hey, everyone My name is Luna, and welcome to your tutorial on getting started with SAS Enterprise Guide So the first question is, what is SAS Enterprise Guide? SAS Enterprise Guide is it easy to use Microsoft Windows client application that provides a visual and intuitive interface to the power of SAS So in this tutorial, I will be highlighting many of the capabilities that SAS Enterprise Guide offers We’ll take a look at some things like, how do we access different types of data? How do we prepare and manipulate that data? We’ll also take a look at several point and click tasks and wizards that Enterprise Guide makes available These are going to help us analyze our data and also generate some reports as well But we’ll also look at the programming side as well Enterprise Guide has a lot of programming features available, so we’ll take a look at some of those We’ll also look at process flows and projects to help organize the work that we do an Enterprise Guide, and we’ll also look at some project features that are available to help customize the work that we do So but that said, let’s go ahead and jump right in The first question I have for you all is, what is your experience level with SAS Enterprise Guide? Maybe you have never really heard of Enterprise Guide before You saw this video decided to click on it, check out what Enterprise Guide is about Or maybe you’ve heard of it, but you haven’t used it yourself You’ve seen other people use it No worries at all if you have no experience with SAS Enterprise Guide This is called Getting Started with SAS Enterprise Guide So I will be starting with square one and then building up from there So again, if you have no experience, no worries at all Maybe on the other hand, you do have experience, whether it’s just a little bit you use it here and there, or maybe it’s something that you use all the time Even if you do have experience, I think that you’ll still find this tutorial helpful Again, I’ll be highlighting many of the capabilities that SAS Enterprise Guide offers, and there’s probably something in there that’s new to you So make sure to stick around All right, so with that in mind, let’s go behind the scenes a little bit Let’s see what goes on behind the scenes in Enterprise Guide and then talk about what is it that we’re going to be working with So it’s important to keep in mind the Enterprise Guide is an interface to SAS SAS itself may be on your local PC, or it might be on a remote server In either configuration that you have, Enterprise Guide is going to prepare your code Now this code might be something that you wrote yourself through a SAS program, or it might be something that was generated for you Our Enterprise Guide point and click tasks and wizards are generating SAS code behind the scenes But again, either way, you have code ready to go That code is going to be sent over to SAS for it to be processed and executed Once that has been executed and the results are ready, the results will be delivered back to Enterprise Guide for you to view So that’s just a little bit of what goes on behind the scenes Now for us, when we’re working at Enterprise Guide, we’re going to be focused on this concept called a project Now a project is really a collection of the different types of files that you’ll be working with in Enterprise Guide These files can include shortcuts to data It can be sounds, programs, and logs It can be your tasks and wizards It could even be the results for your SAS programs and your tasks and wizards Even more so, it could also be some informational notes that get added in for documentation purposes Again, in a project, all of these different items are going to be packaged into one single file called a project, and that project is going to have the extension dot EGP, which stands for Enterprise Guide project Now projects are really nice not only to package everything into one file, but there’s a lot of features that come along with using projects You can control the contents of the project You can control the sequencing You can control the updating, so projects provide a lot of flexibility Now in this course or in the tutorial, for the first part, we’ll mainly be working with our tasks and wizards, and tasks and wizards do require projects So the bulk of our work will be done in an Enterprise Guide project However, starting with Enterprise Guide 8.1, if you’re a SAS programmer and you really just want to, open up data, view the data, and maybe write some SAS programs, you can actually choose to do that without using a project So again, you have some flexibility when it comes to these projects But for the first portion, we will be working with the project because, tasks and wizards require them And when we go over into the programming aspect,

I’ll show you how we can work with Enterprise Guide without using a project Either way we go, as we talk duties different concepts that I’ll be covering in this tutorial, we are going to be working with this data from a company called Orion Star Sports and Outdoors This is a fictitious global company They’re really a sporting goods store So we have some data about Orion Stars’ products, their orders, their employees, and then also their customers Now how this is going to work in this tutorial is for most sections and for most demonstrations that we’ll be going through, I’ll present some sort of business scenario that relates to Orion Stars’ data, again, whether that’s about their products or the customers order employees This is going to be retail data, and it might not really be similar to the data that you work with day to day, but you can probably think of a business problem that’s similar to our scenario that relates to your specific data So as you follow along in the tutorial, I encourage you to think of relatable business problems Let’s go ahead and get started on our first demonstration here I’m going to show you how to navigate through Enterprise Guide, and then we’ll go through a typical workflow So we’ll see how can we add data to a project We’ll analyze the data using a task, and then we’ll see how we can navigate through the contents of our project So let’s go ahead and dive right in Here I have Enterprise Guide opened up And I specifically have Enterprise Guide 8.2 If you want to know which version of Enterprise Guide you have, you can go to the Help menu at the top And then at the bottom, click about SAS Enterprise Guide Next to version, you see I have 8.2, but if you have 8.1, 8.1 and 8.2 will look really similar I’ll go ahead and click OK to close out of this window, and let’s go ahead and talk about the layout of the Enterprise Guide interface At the top, I have my main menus and my toolbar On the right-hand side here, which takes up most of the application window, is your work area And then on the left-hand side, I have my navigation area Let’s go ahead and talk about this in a little bit more detail First, let’s talk about the work area Now, by default, in the work area, I see the Start page open up The Start page lets me quickly start a new SAS program, a project, maybe open up an existing file, or access some tutorials, trainings, and videos about SAS Enterprise Guide In addition, as we open up different files in Enterprise Guide, we’ll actually see that on the start page We’ll see a list of the recent items that we have access, and we can even pin them to the Start page as well Now again, by default, we have to Start page in the work area But as I start to open up different data source programs Or I start running tests I will see tabs appear in the work area for each object that I open up So this is going to be a tab-based interface Now that’s the Start page in the work area Let’s go ahead and move over into the Navigation area The Navigation area consists of several panes, and I’m just going to quickly describe each of these panes here At the very top, by default, I see the Project pane And if I do decide to work in a project in Enterprise Guide, I will see the contents of the active project listed out in the Project pane Below the Project Pane icon, is the Open Items icon The Open Items is a way to be able to see all the items that are currently open up in the work area So right now, I just have the Start page open So I see the Start page listed in my Open Items pane This is a quick way to see what’s open in the work area and manage it in the sense that I can save all the items that are opened up I can close out of all of those tabs Again, it’s a good way to manage everything in the work area Below the Open Items pane icon, I have the Git repositories pane icon here and the Git repository pane provides access to basic Git features, which allows us to track changes and manage version control among multiple users The Git repositories pane is a new pane, starting with Enterprise 8.2 So if you have Enterprise Guide 8.1, you’ll not see this pane there That’s what’s by default on the top portion And let’s come down to the bottom portion here I see these Servers pane The Servers pane will show a list of servers that are known to Enterprise Guide Below the Servers Pane icon is SAS Folders pane icon It will display a list of SAS folders that I can access Below that is the Task Pane icon,

and this is going to display a list of those pointed quick tasks that we can use to help analyze our data And the very last pane here is going to be the Prompt Manager pane We’re going to use this to create, edit, and delete prompts, which allow for user input and tasks in SAS programs So that’s going to be our navigation area there Now because what I want to do is use a task to analyze my data, I know I’m going to need a project So there’s many ways to start a project I’m going to go to File, New, and then select Projects from this menu here Now as soon as I start a project, you’ll notice a process flow is automatically created To back up a little bit, I like to think of my project as my entire story because, again, it’s going to save all the contests that we’re working with in Enterprise Guide But within a story, you have chapters, and that’s what I like to think of process flows as It’s a way to break up all the work that we are doing inside of our whole umbrella of a project So by default, we have our chapter 1, which is this process flow that is currently opened up here Now as I actually start opening up items in my project tables and running tasks, we will see those listed in this process flow tab here, and we’ll actually display the relationship among those items We’ll see that once we actually run a task But now that I have a process flow ready to go, let’s go ahead and add a table to this process flow or to this project Again, many ways to do this– I’ll go to File, Open But there’s one little trick I want to point out here You’ll notice the icon next to open It’s the yellow folder icon That same icon is also on my toolbar So that’s a shortcut So let me go ahead to use the Open a File icon to go to the open window I’ll click My Computer, Browse, and I will be working with the Customers table Notice the extension, .sas7b.– that is the extension used for SAS tables So I’ll select it and click Open Now first thing you’ll notice is that the table actually opens up for me to view, and you’ll notice that it is going to be a tab in that work area If I go over into the Project pane, you’ll notice that, by default, when I open up a file, like a table, it’s going to be added into my project and to that active process flow I just have one process flow, so Customers is added there Now one unique feature about Enterprise Guide 8.1 and 8.2 is the ability to move around our tabs in our panes freely within the application window and even outside of the application as well So to do this, I can really just take my Customers tab and drag it, and right now, it is free floating I can place this wherever I like Again, I can move it off to a separate monitor if you have multiple monitors, or as I’m dragging it, you’ll notice a layout guide that pops up in the middle in blue You can use it to dock this in maybe the bottom portion of the work area, maybe even the right side of the work area So definitely take advantage of that But for now, I’m just going to go ahead and move it back to its original location but know that not just tab So even the panes can be freely moved around inside and outside of our Enterprise Skype interface One point with that is if you move your panes around and you’d like to go back to the default setting, you can go to the View menu, select Reset to Default Layout, and then click restore That’ll put everything back to its original location So if you move things too much, you can go ahead and take advantage of that But now that I have a table added to my project, I can actually use a task to analyze it So with my Customers table opened up, I’m going to go over to my Task pane And the task that I want to use is called characterized data wizard, and that’s going to be under the described category So let me go ahead and expand describe and then double-click characterized data Now the Characterized Data wizard is going to create reports, graphs, and output tables that describe the main characteristics of my table Now because it is a wizard, it’s going to guide us through a couple of steps to be able to create those report graphs and output tables The Characterize Data Wizard specifically has three really quick steps that will go through Now because I had the Customers table opened up into work area when I was starting the task, you

will see that Customers was my active data source, and it’s used as the input table for this wizard So step one of the wizard is just verifying if that is our input table, the table that we want to analyze That is So step one is good to go I’ll go ahead and click Next Step two is selecting our report options The characterize data wizard can create reports, graphs, and SAS tables And by default, all three are selected, and I’m going to leave it as-is I want all of my report options here Now looking at my SAS data sets, my SAS tables that get created, take a look at their table names They have free car frequency for Customers It’s a generic and long name To make that a little bit shorter, a little bit more descriptive, in the Frequency Data pane, I will click Browse, and I’ll go ahead and change a name to customercounts, one word And I’ll go ahead and click Save You can do the same thing for our unit area data table, but I’m good to go with step two So I’ll go ahead and click Next Step three allows us to limit the number of unique categorical values that will be reported per variable 30 seems a little bit high, so I’m going to go ahead and bring that down to 15 That is it for the Characterize Data Wizard I’m going to go ahead and click Finish Behind-the-scenes is generated That’ll be submitted over to SAS Then it’s just going to take a couple of seconds to go ahead and execute As this was executing, although it is done now, in the bottom right-hand corner of Enterprise Guide, there is a Gear icon, which is our submission status button And you can use this to see how long it took a specific task to run, the task status– in this case, there was a warning and when it occurred, for example So I see that this has successfully completed I’ll go ahead and close the Submission Status window, and let’s take a look at our results here You’ll notice that I have a new Characterized Data tab in my work area That allows me to see the results that were generated from this task To see the results a little bit easier, I’m going to go ahead and hold down my Control key and scroll up on my mouse to zoom in on the results just to make it a little bit easier to look at All right, so by default, you’ll notice that on the Characterized Data tab there are four tabs– code, log, results, and output data And by default, I am on the Results tab This is going to show me my summary report and also my graphs So for all of my categorical or character columns, I’m going to see frequency count So the number of times a particular age group occurred in the table– frequency counts there– customer country If you look at something like customer first name, there are a lot of unique values for first names So because of that last third step in the Characterized Data Wizard where I limited the number to 15, I will only see the top 15 names listed, and everything else gets grouped into this all other values category So we have a couple more character columns here I scroll down a little bit further I come to my numeric columns And with my numeric columns, I see some summary statistics, for example, the average age, the median age, minimum-maximum age, and so forth Finally, at the bottom I have graphical representations of this information– so again, looking at something like customer age group, looking at the frequency distribution in a graphical manner– so again, a really, really quick way to get some of that information about my data, including frequency counts and some summary statistics as well Now aside from the report in the graphs, I also requested some output data To check that out, I’m going to click on the Output Data tab Then this is essentially storing the statistics that we saw into an actual SAS table I can use that same technique I’m going to hold down my Control key, and I can scroll up to zoom in a little bit more Here’s one table that contains so summary statistics on numeric columns And if I double-click the other tab– this is for the frequency counts– I get those frequency values in a separate SAS table Because this information is stored in an actual SAS table, I could then take these tables, place them into a different task, and even further analyze the data that I have All right, so let’s go ahead and take a look at our project again Let’s take a step back and look at the big picture

If you look over into my Project pane here, you will notice that the Characterize Data Wizard was added below the Customers table, which indicates its association because the Customers table was the input to this characterized data wizard Let me go ahead and close out of the Characterized Data and Customers tab, and let’s go look at that process flow The Project pane gives me a nice high-level overview of the contents of my project But the Process Flow Tab is where I can see more details So here I can see that the Customers table was input to the Characterized Data Wizard, and it generated three different pieces of output I have two tables– those are my two SAS output tables– and then the report That’s the report plus the graphs all saved into one file here– all right, so again, a lot more information about the relationship among the items that we have in our project Before I explore that Characterized Data Wizard results further, let’s go ahead and save our project What I’ll do is I’ll go to File I’ll go to Save Project, project, and then I’m just going to go ahead and save it in a folder here for this course And I’m going to go ahead and call this Orion’s star because, again, we’re analyzing Orion’s star data And I’ll go ahead and click Save Now let’s go back to that Characterized Data wizard of results I’ve closed out of the tabs, but in order to bring the tab back, what I can do is double-click on Characterized Data either in the process flow tab or in the project pane So let me go ahead and double-click, Characterized Data There’s that tab again And I can go ahead and further explore my results Let’s take a look at the other tabs that we haven’t had a chance to look at yet I’m going to start with the Code tab Remember that Enterprise Guide task wizards are generating SAS code behind the scenes And I can actually take a look at that code on the Code tab here And there is a lot of code that was generated All I had to do was go through quick three steps in the wizard to get the results But again, all that code is here for you to view If you’d like, you can take this code, make a copy of it in a SAS program and maybe make some modifications if you’d like So that’s the Code tab The one last tab we have is the Log tab here The Log tab is going to display messages that were returned from SAS, maybe how long it took to execute a particular part of our code, maybe if there were any warnings or errors Those would be listed out to us in the log here At the top portion of my log, it’s called the Log Summary And it’s a quick way to see the notes, warnings, and errors that were returned I see that I have a couple of warnings But I have a lot of notes in here as well To quickly locate my warnings, what I can do is go ahead and click on the Notes tab to go ahead and deselect it And now I have just Errors and Warnings selected And this makes it easier to identify it as warnings If I want more information about a warning, I can click on it And in the log, it’ll actually jump me to where that log message actually occurred So I can get more information there All right, so that was a Characterized Data wizard and exploring those four different tabs that we got as a result of it Let me go ahead and close my Characterized Data wizard tab And let’s go back to the idea of process flows Now again, I mentioned that process flows are like chapters within our project And so what I’m going to do is I’m going to go ahead and create several process flows for the different topics that we’ll be talking about For this first one right here, I’m going to start by renaming it So to go ahead and rename it, there’s several ways to do this But in my project pane, I’ll go ahead and right-click where it says Process Flow, select Rename, and I’m going to call this one Lesson 1 To create a separate process flow for Lesson 2, what I can do is go to File, New, and then Process Flow This will open up a another process flow tab And I can go ahead and rename this as well Another way to rename is to click on our View and Set Properties button on the process flow toolbar And let’s go ahead and call this one Lesson 2 And go ahead and click OK So now you see in my project, I have multiple process flow–

Lesson 1 and Lesson 2 So now when you open up items in your project, you have to be mindful about which process flow it’s being added to To select your active process flow, you can either make sure that a particular process flow tab is opened, or you can go ahead and select a particular process flow in the project pane Whatever is going to be your active process flow is where your items are going to be added when you open them up inside of your project So that was a quick overview at the layout of our Enterprise Guide interface and going through the typical workflow of adding data to a project and quickly analyzing it using a task specifically to Characterized Data wizard I’m done with this demonstration So I’ll go ahead and save my project So far in this tutorial, we have worked with SAS tables So we saw how we could open up the SAS table in Enterprise Guide, add that table to our project, and then run some tasks against that table to get some analysis about our data But sometimes our data isn’t contained in a SAS table Our data may be contained in something like a Microsoft Excel workbook Or it may be in a text file You can think of things like CSV, which are common delimited files, or maybe tab delimited files as well So the question is, how can we take the data that’s contained in these different types of files and analyze them using our Enterprise Guide tasks? Let’s start by taking a look at this activity here What we’re going to do is we’re going to open up the Products Excel workbook from inside of Enterprise Guide and we’re going to see what happens So let me go into my Enterprise Guide session I’m going to first make sure that my Lesson 1 process flow tab is open so that Lesson 1 is the active process flow Then I’m going to click on to open a file icon to open the open window and select My Computer Now, my data is contained in the data folder, which I’ve already accessed, so you’ll see that listed as a recent location in the open window So I’ll go ahead and select data from here and then locate my products Excel workbook Now, just to remind you, previously, if I was opening up a SAS table, then what happened was that SAS table would open up as tab in the work area and it would be added to my project and I could see that listed in the Project page Now with an Excel workbook, let’s see what happens I’ll go ahead and click Open And we’ll see that actually Excel is opening up So instead of seeing that data in a separate tab in the work area, the Products Excel workbook has opened up for me to view the data from directly inside of Excel Now, if I close out of Excel here, you’ll actually see that the Products Excel workbook was added to my project, specifically in my Lesson 1 process flow But I still can’t use it in a task as is right now, because if I try to open it, it just opens directly inside of Excel So let’s go back into the slides here and talk about what we can do to be able to use our Microsoft Excel data or our text files, for example As is, a lot of these text files, for example, can be considered as unstructured data They don’t have the proper structure to them for us to be able to use them in tasks So what we need to do is import our data into SAS How this goes is we’re going to take our data and we’re going to import them into SAS using the Import Data wizard Being a wizard, again, it’s just going to guide us through a couple of quick steps, then just specify some specifications about the import itself What happens with the Import Data wizard is it’s essentially going to make a copy of our data– our text file or our Microsoft Excel workbook– but in a structured format, in this case, specifically SAS table So once we import our data using the Import Data wizard to create a copy of the data as a SAS table, we can use that SAS table in all of our Enterprise guide tasks for further analysis In this particular business scenario, Orion Star would like to analyze information about their products, but this information is currently stored in a Microsoft Excel workbook called Products In order to use the data contained in this workbook in various analytical tasks, we need to import this data into a SAS table So in this demonstration, I’ll show you how we can import data from a Microsoft Excel workbook into a SAS table using the Import Data wizard Now, I have the Orion Star project open And I currently have the Lesson 1 process flow tap opened up In a previous activity, we opened up the products Excel workbook, and we saw that it would open up in Excel instead of inside

of Enterprise Guide, and a shortcut to that Microsoft Excel workbook gets added to our project So I’m going to go ahead and double-click on products in my Lesson 1 process flow, and we’re going to take a quick look at this workbook and point out a couple of things So the first thing that you’ll notice here is that in my Products Excel workbook, there are two worksheets, which we see as tabs at the bottom– one called ProductList and another called ProdFormat Now for this scenario, I am only interested in the ProductList Excel worksheet Now, if you take a look at this worksheet, you’ll notice that the first row contains what we want to be considered as column names But the very first column actually does not have a name So let’s keep these things in the back of our minds I’m going to go ahead and close Excel And let’s go ahead actually import this data this time Now, instead of double-clicking, since that’ll open the data in Excel, in order to import the data, I’m going to right-click on Products and select Import Data This will open up the Import Data wizard And being a wizard, it’s going to guide us through four quick steps to import the data Step one is some specifications about the data itself We need to verify that the Products Excel workbook is what we want to import in And we can specify some properties about the output SAS table as well You’ll notice the default output table name is Products But I’d like to go ahead and change that So I’ll click Browse And I will call this table ProductList And then I’ll go ahead and click Save That’s it for step one So I’ll Click Next and move on step two Step two is where I verify which part of that Excel workbook I actually want to import in You’ll notice I can choose a particular worksheet, I can choose a range of cells, or if there is a named range, I can go ahead and select that here as well Since I want to read in just a product list Excel worksheet, I’m going to leave it at the default settings But note that you have different options here On the right hand side, I have a couple options I can choose from The first that is selected is first row range contains field names, meaning the very first row in that Excel worksheet has what I want to be considered as column names That’s true, so I’m going to leave that selected And the second option is rename columns to comply with SAS naming convention So I’ll go ahead to select this as well With our SAS column names, the rules are they can be one to 32 characters in length, start with a letter or an underscore, and then continue with letters, numbers, and underscores So if these rules are not met, this option will make sure that our column names are truncated or modified to follow our SAS naming rules That is it for step number two I’ll click Next Let’s move on to step three Now, step three is where I can specify the column attributes So I’m going to go ahead and make this window a little bit larger so we can actually see all the attributes All right, so you’ll notice that a lot of this, Enterprise Guide went ahead and took a guess for us It took a guess at the name, the label, the column type, output format, and more And you can leave this as is However, I’d like to make a couple of changes to the attributes here First thing is a very first column You might remember in Excel that this column did not have a column name In SAS, columns have to have some sort of name, so Enterprise Guide went with F1 Not really descriptive, so I’d like to go ahead and change that So to make that change, in the name field for F1, I will triple-click And I’m going to call this column Product_ID I’m going to do something similar for the label Now, the label provides more flexibility I can have spaces and special characters So I’ll triple-click in the label field and I’ll go with Product space ID for the label That’s it for that first column Now, the only other change I want to make here is to the very last column, which is Supplier_ID Supplier_ID only contains numbers So Enterprise Guide took a guess that this should be a numeric column But this contains ID values I’m not really going to be performing any sort of calculations on an ID column, so I’d rather store it as a character column To make that change, in the type field, I’m going to select Number Then I’m going to select the dropdown arrow that pops up, and I’m going to select String String is the same thing as character

Now, I get this new pop-up box that comes up here And essentially what I need to do is tell Enterprise Guide how the length of this new character column should be determined Now, the length of a character column corresponds to the maximum number of characters that can be stored in each row for that particular column So I need to make sure that it’s long enough to account for the longest data value that I’d have Some options I have in terms of determining the length– I can scan all values in the column, I can scan just a couple of rows, or I can skip the scanning process entirely and go ahead and type in a specific length Because this worksheet is relatively small, I’m going to go ahead and scan all values in the column, click OK And if you take a look at the length field, you’ll notice that the link is 5, meaning that the longest data value was five characters Now again, I can do more changes here I can change the output format I can choose to only import a subset of the columns, using this first column of checkboxes But these are the only changes I want to make I’m done with step three, so I’ll click Next Step number 4, I do have some advanced options that I can choose from I will not be using any of these options now But if you’d like to learn more about them, you can always click on the Help button The Help button is context sensitive, so it’ll take you to the documentation page that’s specific to step four of that Import Data wizard But again, I’m all done so I’ll go ahead and click Finish So I’ll also go through and complete the import process And now I am looking at that SAS table Again, essentially, I created a copy of the Microsoft Excel worksheet, specifically And that data is now in a SAS table as we see here If I take a look here, I’m viewing the column names And I see Product_ID instead of the generic F1 And my last column, I turned it into a character column, which is represented with the pyramid with an A inside of it By default, we are viewing the column name specifically If you’d like to see the labels instead, in the data grid toolbar, you can click this More Options, the three vertical dots, and then select Show labels I only specified a label for Product_ID, but we see that represented here in the data grid now I’m going to go ahead and go back to More options and go back to Show names, but just know that you have that option available to you That is it for my importing, so I’m going to go ahead and close this Import Data tab and take a look at my Lesson 1 process flow You’ll see again, that whole story I see that I have my Products Excel workbook I used the Import Data wizard to import that data into a new SAS table You’ve already seen that we can import data contained in Microsoft Excel workbooks into a SAS table using the Import Data wizard Now in this scenario, Orion Star has data about payroll contained in a common delimited CSV file In order to use this data in various analytical tasks, this data will also need to be imported into a SAS table This is another job for the Import Data wizard So in this demonstration, I’ll show you how we can import data contained in text files into a SAS table I already have my Orion Star project opened up with that Lesson 1 process flow tab active And I’m going to start by opening up the payroll CSV file that we want to work with So I’ll click on the Open a file icon on the toolbar That opens the Open window I’ll go to my computer And from my data folder, I will open up the payroll.csv file So when I select it and click Open, being a text file this actually does open up in a separate tab And I’m going to go ahead and zoom in a little bit so we can take a look at the contents of the CSV file Pointing out just a couple of things here, you’ll notice that the very first row of the CSV file contains our column names And all of our data values, including our column names are separated by commas, again, because this is a CSV file So with those things in mind, I’m going to go ahead and close the payroll tab We see that file added to my Lesson 1 process flow tab So I’m going to use the same technique I did earlier to start that Import Data wizard, which is right-click payroll and select Import data Step one should look very familiar We’re just specifying that payroll is the file that we want to import in And we can make some changes to the name or the storage location of our output SAS table But I’m going to leave this at the default I’m going to leave the name as payroll and go ahead and move on to step two

Step two is where we’re going to see the most differences in terms of importing data from Microsoft Excel workbooks versus importing data from text files Now with this being a text file, you’ll notice that I need to first specify what type of text file this is Does it contain delimited fields or does it contain fixed columns? This is a delimited file And the delimiter is a comma So I can actually leave everything as is But if you have different delimiters, like it’s a tab delimited file or it’s delimited by spaces, you can make that selection here But again, I’m going with the default comma And I have a couple more options on the right-hand side The first option is file contains field names on record number one And that is true That very first row in the is CSV file contains what I want to be considered as column names So I can leave that as is And the second option, Data records start at record number two, again, that is true as well, because my actual data values start on that second row So I don’t need to make any changes in step two here I can go ahead and move on to step three and change some of those column attributes As I did before, I’m going to go ahead and expand this window so we can see all of the attributes that are listed here I’m just going to make a couple of changes The first thing I’d like to do is exclude the job title column from this import Maybe I’m not interested in it, and I don’t really need it in my output SAS table So to avoid importing it in, I can go ahead and uncheck that checkbox, which is in the INC or Included field That’s what INC stands for, included All right, so that’s one change I want to make here Another change I want to make is to my Employee_ID column Enterprise Guide took a guess that this is a date column But this is not a date column It does not contain any date values So in the Type field, I’m going to use that dropdown arrow And I can change it to either a numeric or string or character column We saw string before, so I’m going to go ahead and change it to a numeric column And that looks good to go The last change is just some name and label changes So for the very last column, Termination, I’m going to go ahead and triple-click in the name field, change the name to Term_Date This is just to match the format of our other columns, Birth_Date, Hire_Date And while I’m at it, I’ll also change the label So I’ll triple-click in the Label field I’ll call this Termination space Date That’s it for step number three So I’ll go ahead and click Next Step four, there are some different advanced options, just because this is a text file Again, if you want to learn more about it, feel free to click on that Help button to go check out the documentation But I am done with the import here I’ll go ahead and click Finish And let’s take a look at that SAS table You’ll notice first, our job title is not included in the SAS table, because I unchecked the checkbox and made sure it wasn’t included Employee_ID has been read in as a numeric column, indicated by the blue circle with the pound sign inside of it And here, you’ll see that I have the Termination Date label appear Now, I have the option set to show the labels But remember, you can click on the More Options, three vertical dots, and you can change this to Show names to see the column names or Show labels to show the column labels So if I go back to Show names for example I will see the actual column name, which I set to Term_Date I’ll go ahead and close the Import Data tab and take a look at that Lesson 1 process flow tab again I see my payroll.csv file going through the Import Data wizard to create my output SAS table Now one extra thing I’d like to show you, and it’s something that’s a good habit to keep, is to rename your task labels For example here, the Import Data wizard task label is the Import Data payroll.csv Now, that might be fine But if you’re doing a lot of imports, they’re all going to have these somewhat generic names So it’s a good habit to go ahead and rename them to something more concise and descriptive To make that change, I’m going to right-click on Import Data payroll.csv and select Rename I’ll go ahead and call this Import Employee Payroll Now, I did not rename the import that I did to the Microsoft Excel workbook But you can do the same process of right-click, Rename to go ahead and make that a little bit more concise and descriptive as well So that’s how you import data from a text file

We’ve seen that we can use Enterprise Guide to access different types of data files But oftentimes, that data might not quite be in the shape or form that you need it to be in For example, you may only be interested in a subset of the rows So you may want to filter the data You may not have all the columns that you actually need So you may need to create new columns based off of existing columns You may also have your data stored across multiple tables and you need to join or combine these tables together for analysis All of these data manipulation techniques I’ve mentioned, and more, can be done in the Query Builder inside of Enterprise Guide The Query Builder enables you to extract data from one or more tables, based on criteria that you specify And its output is going to create a clean, new SAS table that you can use for further analysis Behind the scenes, the Query Builder is creating structured query language code or S-Q-L SQL code To get a feel for everything that we can do in the Query Builder, let’s try out this activity I’m just going to open up a SAS table, take a look at the Query Builder and see what all seems to be supported by it So in my Orion Star project, add the Lesson 1 process flow tab opened up And I’m going to the open window And I’m going to go ahead and go into my data folder and open the Orders SAS table Now, on this Orders tab, you’ll notice that on the data grid toolbar, there’s a Query Builder button If I click on the Query Builder button, this will open up the Query Builder with the Orders table as input And I just want to take a look here to see what all it is that we can do You’ll notice a Select Data tab, picking and choosing which columns I like to see in the output table There’s also an option to Select distinct rows only, have the Filter data tab to filter the rows, Sort Data tab to sort the data On the left-hand side, I have Add Tables and Join Tables, meaning I can bring in multiple tables into the Query Builder and combine the data found in those multiple tables into one table There is Computed Columns, so creating new columns I have access to the Prompt Manager There is a button for Preview, Tools, Options And there’s a lot more that we can do in the Query Builder So over the next couple of demonstrations, we’re going to take a look at some of the capabilities that the Query Builder offers In this scenario, Orion Star would like to analyze the total amount invoiced to customers who place internet orders Information about all orders is placed in the Order SAS table Now, to prepare this data for input to various analytical tasks, we need to generate a subset from the Orders table, which we can do using the Query Builder So in this demonstration, I’ll show you how we can use a Query Builder to manipulate our data, which will include selecting columns, creating new columns, filtering rows, and also sorting rows as well Now in my Orion Star project, I have my Lesson 1 process flow tab opened And from the previous activity, I already have the Orders table added to that Lesson 1 process flow So I’m going to go ahead and double-click on Orders And we’re just going to take a look at this table And I want to point out a couple of things before we jump into the Query Builder Now again, I’m interested in customers that placed an internet order And how I know the order type is by this Order_Type column This is a coded column But an order type of 1 means that it was a retail or in-store purchase An order type of 2 means that it was an internet purchase And then an order type of 3 means that it was a phone sale So we’re only going to be interested in the orders of type 2 for internet sales In addition, I am interested in the total amount invoiced to the customer To calculate that amount, we are going to sum up the total retail price with the shipping value So those are going to be the main things that we’ll focus on Let’s go ahead and jump into the Query Builder So since I have the orders tab open, I can click on that Query Builder button on the data grid toolbar The first thing I’d like to do is go ahead and give my query a more descriptive name, and the same for my output table name as well So for my query name, I will call it Internet Orders Query And for my output table, I’ll click Change And let’s change the output table name to Internet_Profit And I’ll go ahead and click Save So in the Query Builder, now, let’s start with the Select Data tab Any columns that I’d like to see represented in the output table

need to be included in the Select Data tab So I’m going to pick and choose a couple of columns from the Orders table to include in my new output table There are several ways you could go about doing this First I’ll show you how we can select a range of columns So if I want everything from Order_ID all the way to Order_Type, what I can do is select Order_ID, hold down my Shift key, and then select Order_Type That will select everything between Order_ID and Order_Type And then I can drag all of those columns on to the Select Data tab In addition, I’d like to include these Shipping and Profit columns as well So other techniques you can use is double-click on a column So if I double-click, Shipping is included Or you can drag columns as well So I’ll drag Profit onto the Select Data tab So again, many techniques you can use to include columns onto that Select Data tab Now, the order that you see the columns listed here on the Select Data tab is the order that you’ll see the columns in the output table So I just want to make one change here I want to take total retail price and I want to move it to below the Order_Type column So you can drag these columns around, or you can use the arrows that are on the right-hand side I’m going to use the move down arrow, click on it a couple of times, so that it goes right below the Order_Type column All right, so those are the of columns I want to include from my original input table Now again, I’m interested in the total amount invoiced to the customers And that’s a new column that I’ll have to create So to create a new column, I’m going to click on the calculator icon on the right-hand side And if you hover over it, it says Add a New Computed Column This opens up the new Computed Column wizard And just click four steps to define a new column In step one, since I’m going to be using an arithmetic expression to create this new column, I’m going to select Advanced Expression And that’s it for step number one I’ll go ahead and click Next In step number two, I’m going to specify the expression for this new column Now remember, the total amount invoiced to the customer is the total retail price added together with the shipping amount So I can go ahead and type in that expression here in the expression box But I can also point and click to create this expression as well So to do this, what I’m going to do is I’m going to expand in the bottom left-hand corner where it says Selected Columns These are going to be the columns that are included on that Select Data tab To include a column into the expression, I can just double-click on it So I’ll first double-click on Total Retail Price That gets added to my expression And let me go ahead and zoom in here so we can see that a little bit better And I want that added to, so I’ll go ahead and you can type a plus sign or you can click the plus sign button And then I’ll double-click on Shipping Right, so total retail price plus shipping You’ll notice that in front of the column name, you see t1 t1 is simply a table alias You can think of it as a nickname for the Orders table It doesn’t hurt to have it in here, but it’s actually not necessary in this case So if you wanted to type out the expression yourself, you would not need to include t1 here But my expression looks good to go So I’m going to go ahead and click Next And then step three specifies some of those column attributes First thing is a column name I’m going to call this column Invoice_Amt for amount And this is going to be a currency value So it may be nice to apply a format to this column so that we can see dollar signs and commas represented in our output table So to apply a format, I’m going to click on Change Again, this is a currency value So under the Categories pane, I’ll select Currency We have a lot of options for formats here, but I’m going to select the DOLLARw.d format And again, formats are all about how our data values are going to be displayed The dollar format will display our values with dollar signs and commas included Now my overall width is the number of spaces I’m allowing for this formatted value So I just need to make sure that it’s wide enough so that all of the numbers, dollar signs, commas, and decimal places can be properly displayed In our case, I’m going to bring this up to about 10 That should be enough for our value here I’d also like to see some decimal places

So for decimal places, I will bring the value up to 2 to say display two decimal values That is it for the format I’ll click OK I see the dollar format represented here And that’s it for step three I’ll click Next Step four is just a verification page, a summary of everything that we specified It all looks good, so I’ll go ahead and click Finish You’ll notice that the invoice amount column has been automatically added to my Select Data tab and it’s also in the list of columns under Computed Columns This means that I can take this new Computed Column and use it to filter my data or even store all my data as well All right, but those are all the columns I want to include That looks good to go So let’s move on to the Filter Data tab now Now, I’m only interested in internet orders, so I need to create a filter on the Order_Type column So to go ahead and start that, I’m going to locate Order_Type in my list of columns and drag it on to the Filter data tab This is going to start the New Filter wizard And again, just two quick steps in order to create this filter here I want the order type to be equal to– and I want it to be equal to 2 for internet orders Now, you could type in a value of 2 here Or you can actually retrieve the value from the input table If you click on this down arrow here to get values and then click on the Get values button, Enterprise Guide will go look at your Order_Type column and give you a list of the unique values in that order type column So I could go ahead as select 2 here and they’ll be added in to my value box Go ahead and click Next Step two, again, is just a summary of the properties I’ve specified Everything looks good, so I’ll go ahead and click Finish Last thing is to store our data, so I’ll click on the Store Data tab And here, I’d like to sort on the Order_ID column, so I’ll double-click Order_ID That gets added to my Sort Data tab And I can actually choose a source direction, ascending or descending, but I’m going to leave it at the default descending order That’s it I’m done with everything I want to do So I’m going to go ahead and click Run The query is executed, and here is our brand new output table You’ll notice that every row has an order type of 2 because of the Filter that I set And I have my brand new Invoice_Amt column that is a total of the Total Retail Price and Shipping columns That’s it That’s some of the capabilities and functionality that the Query Builder offers We’ve seen that we can use the Query Builder to perform a lot of data manipulation techniques, including creating new columns, filtering rows, and sorting rows as well One other common data manipulation technique that you may need to use is the ability to join or combine tables together Joining tables means that we’re taking columns from different tables of multiple tables and bringing them together into one single table Let’s look at our business scenario here We have this table called Products and it contains information about Orion Star’s products It includes things like the product ID, product category, and also the product name In addition, it contains some information about the supplier of the product, like the supplier country, name, and ID Now, the supplier country column contains country codes So it’s just a two-letter country code If I want more information about that country code, I would need to look at a different table called country_region_lookup country_region_lookup will actually explain what each of those country codes mean And it’ll even tell me the region that the country falls under So since I want more information about my supplier country, I would want to join these tables together so I have all columns from both tables available in one single table for me to use Now, when we’re performing a joint in the Query Builder, by default an inner join will be performed But before I go into the different types of joins, let’s talk about what a join really means When you are combining tables together, there needs to be some sort of criteria so that you know that Row 1 from Table A goes with Row 1 from Table B. That’s going to be our joining criteria So let’s take a look at this simple example here I have a table called employee_payroll, and it contains some salary information about my employees I have another table called employee_organization, and this contains department information

for all of my employees What I’d like to do is join these tables together so that I have both the salary and department information for my employees in one single table That’s a join Now, how do I know each row from a single table goes with another row from another table? In this scenario, it’s going to be based on the values of the employee ID column I know that if there is a match, then those rows belong together in my new output table So for example, the employee ID ending in 01, we see it in employee_payroll We see it in employee_organization That’s a match and so we’ll see that salary and department information all in one single row That’s a join Now, specifically with an inner join, we are only going to keep the matches So 01 is in employee_payroll 01’s in employee_organization That’s a match It’ll be included in our new output table Same goes for 02 and 03 as well However, employee ID 04, for example, only exists in employee_payroll There’s not a match there Employee ID 05 only exists in employee_organization Again, not a match there Because I’m performing specifically an inner join, which is a default type of joint in the Query Builder, only matches will be included in my output table, which includes employee IDs 01 all the way through 03 Now, there are different types of joins that we can perform in the Query Builder But in this tutorial, we’re going to focus on inner joins We’re going to revisit a previous business scenario where we want more information about Orion Star’s different products Information about their products was imported in from the Products Excel workbook But now, the analysts at Orion Star want more information about the supplier country This information can be found in a separate SAS table called country_region_lookup So to have all this information in one table we need to join the tables together So in this demonstration, I’ll show you how we can use the Query Builder to join tables together In my Orion Star project in the Lesson 1 process flow tab here, I previously imported the data in from the Products Excel workbook into a SAS table So I’m going to start by double-clicking on the table icon– this is the product list table that I created earlier– so we can take a look at its contents Again, our focus right now is the Supplier_Country column This is simply a two-letter country code And I want more information I want to know what the country code stands for as well as a region that this country belongs in This information is again found in a separate table called country_region_lookup We’ve been using the Open window to access our files up until this point, but I want to show you another way What you can do is in the Servers pane, you can go ahead and expand servers, expand the name of your server– mine is called local– expand files And from there, you can follow the path to the data So if I scroll down, I have my data folder, which contains all the data we need in this tutorial Here’s country_region_lookup And previously, what happened with the Open window is when you open the data, it opens in the data grid and it automatically gets added to the project That is also the case when you open data from the Servers pane, but you actually have a little bit more flexibility What you can do is you can right-click on the table name And you’ll notice that there are several options here You can choose to simply open the table without adding it to your project You can open the table and add the table to your project, which again, is a default behavior Or you can simply add the table to the project without opening it up So again, you have a lot of flexibility in terms of how items are added or not added to your project You can also change the default behavior, as well, just to quickly show you where to find that If you go to the Tools menu at the top, and then go to Options, which is at the bottom of the Tools menu This opens up the Options window Specifically, if you go to Project and Process Flows, you can clear the first option, which says when an item is opened, automatically add to the project That way when you open up a file, it will not be added to your project automatically You can then choose to manually add items to your project Now, I’m going to stick with the default behavior So I will not clear this checkbox But just wanted to show you that again, you have some flexibility when it comes to projects So I’ll go ahead and close out of the Options window I would like to actually add country_region_lookup to my project And I want to view it as well, so I’ll

go ahead and double-click on it so we can take a look Now, before I perform a join, ideally I’d like to look at these tables side by side or stacked on top of each other So I mentioned before that you can move the tabs freely within or outside of the application window But another trick is if you right-click on the tab– so I’ll right-click on country_region_lookup– I can select either New vertical tab group or New horizontal tab group I’ll go with horizontal And this allows me to have a stacked view in my work area so I can have something on the top and then something else on the bottom So in my case, I have the imported table on top and country_region_lookup on the bottom Now, comparing these two tables, again, I have supplier_country with the country codes up top, which is my product list table, and I have a similar column but it’s called country_code in my country_region_lookup table But it still contains those two-letter country codes What I need to do is perform a join between country_code and supplier_country so that I have the full country name and region name together with all the information about my products So that’s the goal here So in order to start the Query Builder with both tables as input, I’m going to go ahead and first close out of both of these table tabs And let’s go back to that Lesson 1 process flow One way I can start the Query Builder with both tables is select one of the tables I’m going to hold down my Control key and select the other table With both tables selected, I can right-click on one of the tables and then select Query Builder This will start the Query Builder with both tables as inputs However, you notice that you will see a warning message saying a suitable join can not be determined for a new table So we need to do the joins manually That’s not a problem I’ll go ahead and click OK And let’s take a look at this tables in Joins window I mentioned earlier that Enterprise Guide, by default, performs an inner join And by default, it’s going to perform and inner join on columns that have the same name and are the same type However, we saw that our columns that contain that same information don’t have the same name One is called supplier_country and the other is called country_code Because they didn’t have the same name, SAS did not automatically perform that join But no worries, we can go ahead and manually perform the join The one requirement is that the column types do need to be the same And that is satisfied here, but it’s because both of these are character columns So to go ahead and perform the join manually, I’m going to start by selecting supplier_country in the product list table Then I’m going to drag supplier_country– I’m going to try one more time– drag supplier_country to on top of country_code and release Now the join will be formed on these columns But I can specify what type of join I’d like to perform I’m going with an inner join, so only matches, which is the default But again, there are other types of joins available for you to include non-matches in your output table if you’d like But again, I’m going with the inner join It’s an equality I want supplier_country to be equal to country_code I’ll go ahead and click OK I see that they are now connected with an inner join So I’ll go ahead and click Close And now I’m back into the Query Builder The only difference now from before is that now I have two tables listed here on the left-hand side rather than just one Now, all columns from both of these tables are available for me to use anywhere in the Query Builder, which is really powerful I’m going to go ahead and start the Query Builder as I usually do, go ahead and start by providing a name for my query I’ll call this Products Info Query And for my output table name, I’ll click Change And I’ll call it Products_Info And go ahead and click Save Now, I’ll go ahead and pick and choose the columns I want to include I want to include almost everything from the first product list table So as a shortcut, what I can do is take where it says t1PRODUCTLIST, drag that onto the Select Data tab And that’ll include all columns from product lists on that Select Data tab But since I’ve performed a join, I’d also like to see the columns from country_region_lookup Specifically, I’d like the full country name So double-click on country_name, and then also the region

So I’ll double click on region since I’m going to have the full country name, I don’t really need that two-letter country codes So I’ll go ahead and select supplier_country on the Select Data tab and then click on the trashcan icon, which is our delete button So supplier_country will not be included in our output table Now again, you can take this a step further You can use any of these columns to filter all your rows You can use any of these columns to sort your table But this is all I want to do here I’m good to go So I’ll go ahead and click Run And let’s take a look at our output table here So I have information about all of my products But now I just have more information about the supplier specifically We see that I have the supplier’s country with it named fully spelled out So instead of just US, I have United States, and also the region included as well, so North America Let me go ahead and close out of this tab And I just want to show you one thing on the Lesson 1 process flow tab When you perform a join, you can actually, again, see that relationship in the process flow tab I see that both the table that was imported from the Products Excel workbook and the country_region_lookup tables went into the products info query to perform that join And the result of the join was a table that we were just looking at, Products Info So again, joins are really powerful It allows you to bring columns from multiple tables together into one single table So far in this tutorial, we’ve seen how we can use Enterprise Guide to access different types of data and then manipulate and prepare that data Now that we have nice clean data to work with we are finally ready to start analyzing this data And we’re going to do that using Enterprise Guide Tasks So what’s a task? Tasks are point-and-click Interfaces that are going to guide us through analytical and data preparation processes Now, there are tons of tasks available for us to choose from in Enterprise Guide And we’ll go ahead and explore some of those in just a bit But these tasks are actually going to be based off of SAS procedures or SAS code So as you point-and-click your way through a task, behind the scenes, SAS code is generated And when you run the task and that SAS code is submitted and executed, as output, we’re going to get formatted results And these results are going to depend on the tasks that you’re using But they could be reports, they could be graphs, or they could even be output tables as well Now, before we go ahead and take a look at some of the tasks that are available in Enterprise Guide, I wanted to quickly talk about the difference between tasks and wizards Now, so far in this tutorial, we have seen some examples of wizards, specifically So we saw things like the Import Data wizard and the Characterized Data wizard Now, these are called wizards, specifically, because they guide us through the process of creating our results You might remember that there were steps one, two, three, or steps one, two, three, four And we were able to quickly get the results that we were looking for That’s what a wizard is However, if you take a look at the list of tasks– which I’ll again show you in just a bit– there are going to be some tasks that have both a wizard version and a task version, instead of just a wizard version like the Import Data wizard and Characterized Data wizard, or just task versions One example is the Bar Chart wizard and the Bar Chart task So what’s the difference there? Well, again, with a wizard, or something like the Bar Chart wizard, it is guiding us through the process of creating our output steps– one, two, three, four for example And wizards are really meant to be a very quick way to get the results that we’re looking for And because of that, there’s going to be a limited number of options that are available in the wizard itself Now with a task, tasks are going to have more options that we can set more customization options that are going to be available So if there are tasks that have both the wizard and the task version available, and you want to know which one you might want to use, well, if you just want to quickly get results in, you don’t need to set too many options, or you don’t need to customize the results too much, then you can use the wizards, again, quickly get the results However, if you’re looking for more customization options to really customize the look of the output that you’re getting, you’d probably want to go with the task version instead So just kind of keep that in the back of your mind With that, let’s go ahead and actually look at the task that we have Now, we’re not going to be able to talk about all the tasks that we have in Enterprise Guide because there are a lot But I want to show you where you can find these tasks and where you might be able to get some more information about them as well

So let me hop over into Enterprise Guide And I have my Orion Star project open up here And we want to take a look at the task pane in our navigation area Now, right now, you’ll notice that my tasks are by default categorized And if I wanted to look at the different tasks, I could expand a certain category, like data, for example, and see the tasks that fall under that category So under Data, for example, I have a Data, Compare Data, and more Now, if you don’t like looking at tasks through categories, you’d rather just see a listing of tasks, instead, you can change that So in the Tasks pane, there is this button And it’s our Sort button with the up and down arrow If you click on the Sort button, you can choose Name instead And this will give you an alphabetical listing of all the tasks that we have available to us in Enterprise Guide So that might be something that you prefer In addition, because there are a lot of tasks that are available, you can search for certain tasks using this filter to task list search button Go ahead and type in, for example– and I’ll keep going to this example– but bar chart And here we will see some of the tasks that allow us to create these bar charts, which again, there are a lot of options here Let me go ahead and click X here and go back to our list of all the tasks that we have here Now, to find out more information about a task very quickly, what you can do is simply hover over a task So for example, if I hover over Append Table, I can see some information Let me just hover over that one more time I can see the category It’s in the data category It’s a SAS procedure that’s generated behind the scenes, which is going to be SQL And then a description It concatenates a series of tables to create an output dataset And again, that’s just a quick description But because there are so many tasks, it’s nice to be able to just simply hover over a particular task or wizard and quickly get some information about it One other thing I’d like to mention here is maybe there are going to be tasks that you’d like to use quite often So maybe for your work, you tend to create– let’s go, I keep using bar chart, so let’s do something else Let’s say a donut chart for example One thing that you can do is you can make certain tasks a favorite There is a little star icon next to each of the tasks If you select that star– again, I just did this with a donut chart as an example– this task is now a favorite This is going to be nice because now you can quickly access this task For example, right now the view in the Task pane is SAS Tasks, looking at all the tasks that I have available If I use that drop-down menu, I can change it to Favorites to just quickly see my favorite tasks And by default, the Import Data Wizard and the Query Builder are going to be favorite tasks Not only that, but if you open up a table– and I’m just going to open up a random table I have in my project– do the Orders table, for example– there is a task button on a data grid toolbar And using that task button, you can quickly access your favorite tasks and then also some recent tasks here as well So again, if there are tasks that you’re going to use all the time, I would highly recommend favoriting them, because there are so many tasks that we have available in Enterprise Guide With that said, again, we don’t have time to explore all of these tasks But we are going to take a look at a couple So let me hop back over into my slides and quickly mention the tasks that we’ll focus on in this tutorial So in this tutorial, we are going to mainly look at two tasks We will look at the one-way frequency tasks which will allow us to quickly generate one-way frequency reports And then we will also look at the bar chart tasks, which will help us create bar charts And these tasks and more can be used to analyze your data But even more so, you could use them to explore your data if you would choose to do that instead In addition, I think we’ll also take a look at a pie chart as well So similar to a bar chart, but again just looking at a different type of graphs to see how we can use these tasks to generate different types of output Now, as we go through these different types of tasks, there are going to be some options that are specific to the task itself For example, in a bar chart task, you specify what shape you want the bar charts to be But you probably wouldn’t do that in the one-way frequency task, because you’re creating a report however there are going to be some options that we will consistently see among most of the tasks that we work with And I want to go ahead and point those out here For most of the tasks that you’ll see in Enterprise Guide, you’ll most likely start by selecting some sort of input data source Which table are we actually analyzing?

And in addition, you might want to apply a quick filter to that table as well In addition, you will most likely need to assign your columns to various tasks roles And these task roles tells us how a column should be used in the task Should this column be our analysis column? Should this column be our grouping column, and more There are different types of task roles, depending on the tasks that you’re using But all of these options here– so input, data source, filtering, and setting our column rules– are going to be done in the data panel of a task In addition, if your task is creating some sort of a report, then you probably want to add in some titles, something that’s going to be related to the content that’s being reported on So you’ll most likely see a Titles panel where you can set titles and footnotes Another comment panel and task is going to be the Properties panel And the Properties panel allows us to rename that task label– so the label that we’re seeing represented in our project Then we can also modify our output format as well So instead of seeing a default HTML output, you may want to choose to generate the results as a PDF or maybe even Excel file as well So throughout this tutorial, we are going to use this as a basis and explore the one-way frequencies task and also the bar chart and pie chart tasks as well Let’s go ahead and start looking at our first task, which is the one-way frequencies task Now, the one-way frequency task is going to generate one-way frequency reports And the idea with this task is that it’s going to help us address the question of how many Some examples using the Orion Star data could be how many products do I have in each product category How many orders were placed in each order type? How many employees are in each department? Or maybe even how many customers are in each customer age group? Again, all of these questions are about how many And that’s exactly what the one-way frequency task allows us to address Before we take a deep dive into the one-way frequencies task, I just want to take a quick look at it to be able to address this one question here I mentioned earlier that in most tasks, you will need to assign your columns to various task roles to specify how that column should be used in that task Again, is it our analysis variable, is it our grouping variable, and so forth So the question here is looking at the one-way frequency task, is there a task role that requires a variable or column assignment? Let’s go into the Orion Star project to see if we can answer this question So what I’m going to do is I’m going to start by selecting really, any table that’s already in my project I’m just going to select Customers in the Project pane and make that the active data source With it selected, I’m going to go to my Task pane to go ahead and locate the one-way frequency task Now, I have it in categories, but if you have it in the alphabetical order instead, so just the listing of tasks, you can just scroll to the O’s and you’ll be able to find one-way frequency there But I’ll go ahead and expand the Describe category– that’s where you’ll find the one-way frequency task– and then double-click one-way frequencies Because I had a customer selected in the Project pane, it was my active data source, so it is automatically used as the input data source to this task Now, if you look at the Task Roles pane, I see that there are three roles available in the one-way frequency task– Analysis variables, we have the Frequency count, and then we also have the Group analysis by role And Enterprise Guide makes it pretty easy for us Is there one that’s required? Well, probably the analysis variables, because it says a variable required, right underneath that task role Then you’ll notice out right now, because I have not assigned a column to this task role I can’t click on the Run button So if I make, at least, some selection here So if I maybe take customer age group for example, and drag it to that analysis variables rule, now I have done that required assignment, and just by doing that one thing that run button is now enabled So what’s really nice about these Enterprise Guide tasks, is that, really at the bare minimum, you just need to select your input data source, and assign columns to require task roles, and you will be able to get a default output, just by doing those two things Now in upcoming demonstration, we’re going to focus more on the other types of customizations that we can make in this task, to get the report that we are looking for In this scenario, the how many question, that we’d like to address is, how many products

does a Ryan star offer for each product category? So in this demonstration, I’ll show you how we can use the one way frequencies test, to generate one way frequency reports, that help us address these how many questions In Enterprise got to have the Orion Sar project open, and I’ll be working in the lesson to process flow this time So what the lesson to process will open and active, I’m going to use a service pane to add data to my project In the server’s pane, I’ve already expanded servers My server name, which is local, and files And I’ve already expanded out to the folder that contains the data this is tutorial Now, I’d like to use the products table And I don’t, necessarily, need to open and view this table I just needed to add it to my project, so that I can use it in task So I’m going to use that trick I showed you before, which is to right click the Products table, and select Add to project That way gets added to my project, but I won’t open up from me to view With the table added, and making sure that it’s selected, so that is the active data source, I’m going to go to the task pane, expand the describe category, and then double click on One Way frequencies This opens up the one way frequency tasks, with the products table as input Now, by default, we are on the data panel And this is where we can choose our input table, apply a filter, if we’d like to, and assign our columns to task rules Now, I mentioned earlier that we need to have some sort of column assigned to the analysis variables role It’s required But we didn’t really talk about what that role means So if you want more information about these different task roles, or really you’d want more information about the task, in general, you’re going to want to click on the Help button, in the bottom right hand corner So I’ll go ahead and click on Help This is context sensitive, so it’s going to take just a second to load But what’s happening, is I’ve been taking to the documentation page about the one week frequency task, but it’s specifically about that data panel So we see in this page, I’m having more information about those different task roles I can see the analysis variable roles, specifies variables to be analyzed, and for each variable that we assign to this role, the task creates a one way frequency table And if I wanted to assign columns to other task roles, I could go ahead and read about that right here If you want more information about other parts about the one way frequencies task, you can go ahead and use the help on when you’re in a different part of the task, or, now that we’re already in the documentation, I can simply navigate to the different options, or the different portions under do one way frequency task Like if I wanted to learn more about the statistics option, I can like down this button here And you’ll notice that there are sections for all the different tasks that we have available in Enterprise Guide So take advantage of the Help button, in a documentation that’s available, so that you can learn more about the different options and settings that are available in all of these different tasks But now let me know about the analysis variables rule, I’m going to go ahead and minimize my browser, and return back to the one way frequencies task Now, remember, in this scenario, I would like to know how many products, which correspond to rows, there are for each product category So in this case, product category will be my analysis variable So I’m going to select product category I could track it over to the analysis variables rule, but I’m going to, instead, select it Click on the plus sign, and then assign it specifically to the analysis variables rule Now, again, this is the only task rule that is required, and, because I did that one thing, I can actually go ahead and run and create a report right now I’m, actually, going to go ahead and do that, so we can see the default report, then will come back into the task, and make some additional changes So I’ll go ahead and click Run Here’s our report I’m going to zoom in a little bit, so we can take a look at what we have The report’s title, one way frequencies, results And you’ll notice that in my output report, I have one row for each unique product category And I have the frequency, the percentage, and then, also, the cumulative frequency and percentage, as well So, for example, I know that looking at just one example, here, in the Gulf product category, there are 346 products, which make up about 6% of all of the products that are available Again, of long with the cumulative frequency and percentages So this is a good starting point, and already helps us to address our question However, maybe I’d like to make some modifications Maybe I only want frequency percentage value,

then maybe it’d be nice to make title a little bit more descriptive If I want to go back and make changes to the task, I do not need to start from scratch What I can do, is you’ll notice on the task toolbar, there is a modified task button When I click on this button, I am back right into the one ray frequency task, and I can just continue to make additional changes So let’s go ahead and make those changes, here I’m going to start by going to statistics, and the selection pane And I’m going to focus on frequency table options Again, the default is to have frequencies, percentages, and the cumulatives I just want frequencies and percentages So I’ll go ahead and select that option That’s it for Statistics, for now How about, along with the summary report, also creating a bar chart to have a graphical representation of the data? Well, to do that in the selection pane, I can select plot I have the option of, either a horizontal or vertical bar chart For this example, I’ll go with a horizontal bar chart Let’s take it a step further Along with a report, a graph, and then let’s go ahead and add an output table Let’s store this data into a table, so that we can use it for further analysis So I’m going to click on Results I’m going to go ahead and select the checkbox that says Create Data set, with frequency and percentages And the default name for the table is, again, generic and long Let’s go out and change that Click Browse, and, for this example, I will call the table Product Counts Product Counts, and click Save Now, continuing on with the report that we have, we know that the title right now is the default, one way frequencies results I’d like to make that a little bit more descriptive So in the selection pane, I’m going to select titles Now, titles is one of those panels that you will see very often in a lot of tasks, because most house will generate some sort of report, where you might want to specify a specific title So to change the title, I’m going to clear a checkbox that says, use default text I’m going to delete the default title And I’m going to change the title to number of products per category Number of products per category All right Last thing that I’d like to do here is, go ahead and change the tax label If you look at the project pane, you’ll notice that the default tax label is one way frequencies It’s really just the name of the task That might be OK, but if you use a one way frequency task multiple times, you would have one way frequencies, one, two, three And it’ll be hard to distinguish between all of them So let’s go ahead and make a task label more descriptive I’ll click on Properties, in the selection pane And here I’m going to click on Edit There’s a lot of things we can do in the Properties window We’ll see some of it later on But for now, I’m simply going to modify the label field, and change it to products per category Products per category, and then, click OK So I’ve made a lot of adjustments Again, to remind you, I’m going to move the one way frequency task window What we have here is the default report All I did was assign a column to the analysis variables rule Now that I’ve made some changes, let’s give this a run And let’s see what our updated report’s going to look like Here we go The title, the lot more descriptive, than just one way frequencies, that we had before I’m only seeing the frequency in percentage values in my report now Then I scroll down I have a graphical representation of this information with a horizontal bar chart Again, sometimes having that graphical representation, can help put the numbers in some more context, give it a different perspective Now, in addition to the output, the report, and then the graph, I also requested an output table So if I take a look at the output data tab, here’s that table It looks very similar to my report, where I have a count column for the frequency count, and percent for the percentages It’s just now stored and an actual SAS table, which I could then take, put it into another task, and perform some additional analysis on it if I’d like All right So that’s looking pretty good But there’s one more change that I’d like to make So I’m going to go back to the results tab We changed our title But you might have noticed this extra title, that was automatically added in, which says the FREQ procedure Now, I did not request for this to be added in I did not have that in myself

This is simply automatically added in You might remember me mentioning that all of our tasks correspond to SAS procedure, or SAS code And the name of that procedure, sometimes gets automatically represented, depending on the procedure or task that’s used So in this case, we see this actual procedure title called the FREQ procedure This may be useful In my case I’d like to go ahead and remove it So to remove any of these procedure titles, you’ll want to go to the Tools menu, and then go to Options at the bottom And in the options window, I’m going to go to Task, general So that’s the general subcategory under task And you’ll notice this checkbox that says include SAS procedure, titles, and results I don’t want that I simply need to clear this checkbox, and then click OK Now, I made that change, but I’m still seeing the FREQ procedure title represented All I need to do, is just run this task one more time, to get the most up to date results We’ve seen that we can use modify task, which will go back into the task, and let us make additional changes If all you need to do is rerun the task, without making changes to the task itself So in our case, we change the system setting, or maybe the input data has updated, but you don’t need to make changes to the task itself You can simply click on Run, instead So click Run Here’s our final updated report, and now you see that we no longer have that procedure title represented So that’s how you can easily make a one way frequency report, using the one way frequencies task I’d like to address a different how many question And in this scenario, Orion Star would like to know the number of employees by job title And they’d like to take this a step further, and group the results by department So in this demonstration, we’ll revisit the one way frequencies task, but I’ll show you a couple of additional options In Enterprise Guide I have my Orion Sar project open, and I will be doing work in the lesson to process flow, again I’ve already expanded to my data folder into servers pane, and we’d like to work with the employee master table So I’ll go ahead and right click employee master, and select Add to project Then I’ll go to the task pane, expand the describe category, and then double click one way frequencies Now, as we did before, we’re going to start by assigning columns to task roles And remember, in this scenario, we want to know the number of employees by job title So job title will be our analysis variable I’ll go ahead and take job title, and drag it over to the analysis variables rule Since I’d like to group my results by department, department will be my group analysis by role So take department and go ahead and drag it to that group analysis by role Now, I’m going to go ahead and just make a couple of additional changes I’m going to start by going to statistics, in the selection pane And, as we did before, extent of including the cumulative frequency and percentages, I’m going to change that to just frequencies and percentages Now, there’s an additional option that I’d like to show you, and that is going to be in the results panel, in the selection pane What happens, by default, is that when you look at your results, the rows are ordered in alphabetical order, by the values of the analysis variable But I like to change that to be by frequency order, instead So, at the bottom, the order output data by option, I’m going to use the drop down menu, and change that to descending frequencies From there, It does have two more things which we’ve seen before, which is changing the title, and then changing the task label So I’m going to go to titles in the selection pane, clear to use default text checkbox, and go ahead and delete the existing title Let’s change out to employees by job title Employees by job title Let’s go ahead and delete the default footnote, as well So in the section pane, I’m going to select footnote, clear the use default text checkbox, and simply delete the existing footnote Last tab, go to Properties, click Edit, and, instead of the default label of one way frequencies, I’m going to change that to jobs by depth FREQ report So jobs by, depth, for department, FREQ, for frequency report And then, click OK That’s it Let’s go ahead and give this to run, and let’s take a look at our report I’m going to go ahead and zoom in, so it’s a little bit easier to see the results

And you’ll notice that, unlike before, where I just had one single table as in my report, I now have multiple tables I have one for each unique value of department So for example, my first table is for the department being account And within the accounts department, I can see the unique job titles listed here I also set the options, so that the rows are ordered by descending frequencies So I see the job title with the highest number of employees, which is Accountant I, on the accounts department, listed first, and then it goes in descending order from there And, as I scroll through this report, again, I get one report for each unique value of department And it looks pretty good So those are some additional options that we have available in the one way frequencies task Continuing with our discussion on analyzing our data, one great way to be able to visually represent the information that you have, is through graphs Now there are tons of graphing tasks available, and Enterprise Guide And I have a couple of examples, here for you, to show you the type of graphs that you could create You can create a bar line chart You could create stacked bar charts You can create map charts, so we’re actually overlaying our data values over maps Then you can even create a tile chart, as well And these are not the only options available There are so many tasks for you to be able to choose from So in this tutorial, we are going to focus on analyzing our data using bar charts, and we’ll also take a look at pie charts, as well In this scenario, the management team for the children product line, would like to understand the purchasing habits of customers, that are not in the Orion club shopping program So for this analysis, what they’d like to do, is they’d like to see the average profit figures for each individual product group that’s within the children product line So in this demonstration, I’ll show you how we can use the bar chart task, to create bar charts And we’ll also see how we can filter our data within a task, as well At the end, I’ll show you one project feature we can use to help document the work that we do inside of the project So in Enterprise Guide, I have the Orion start project open And, again, we’ll be doing our work in the lesson to process flow In the servers pane, I’ve already expanded to the data folder for this tutorial So I’m going to go ahead and right click on the Orion profit table that we’ll use, and select Add to project Then I’ll go to the task pane, expand graph And you’ll notice that we have, both a bar chart, and a bar chart wizard So we talked before that a wizard version is going to have less options, as compared to the full bar chart task Now, specifically, if you want to compare to two, if you would like to do things, such as customizing your reference lines, applying formats to your columns, maybe you like to change the shape of the bars in the bar chart, or maybe you’d like to customize the axis labels and values To be able to do those things, you would have to use a bar chart task, instead of the bar chart wizard And I do want to take advantage of some of those features So I’m going to double click on bar chart, which, again, will be the bar chart task But the first thing that I’ll do here, is pick what type of bar chart that I’d like to create For this example, I’m going to go with a vertical colored bar, which will create a vertical bar chart with different colored bars Next, in the selection pane, I’m going to move on to data, which will look very familiar to what we saw in the one way frequencies task We have our input data source, we can apply a filter, and assign columns to task roles Now, in Orion profit, I have profit information about products from all product lines But I’m only interested in the children product line So I’m going to show you how you can apply a filter within the task We can, of course, use the Query Builder to create a new table, and use that new filter table in the bar chart task But if you just need to apply a simple filter, this is a really quick way to do it So here, in the data panel, I’m going to click on where it says Edit And this will allow me to bring up the edit data and filter window to apply a very simple filter to my data In this case, what I’m going to do is, from the first drop down menu, select the column that I want to filter on I want to filter on the product line column The second drop down menu is going to be the different operators that we have available to us And here, I’m going to go with equality So I’ll select equal to In the last box, I can type in the value that I want product line to be, or I can go ahead and choose a value from the input table So to choose it, I’m going to click on these three dots here This is our value selector button And I have the different values for product line that exist in the Orion profit table I’m going to select children, and click OK

And then we have a filter I will only now be analyzing rows where the product line is equal to children So I go ahead and click OK I see that filter represented in task filter And now I can move on, like I’ve done before, where I can assign different columns to my task roles here So, again, I want to look at average profit figures by product group Because I want each of the bars to be represented by product group, I will assign product group to the column to chart rule Now, for the height of the bar, again, that’s going to be my average profit value So I’m going to look for profit, and assign profit to the sum of role Now, in order to control the statistic, that is used to calculate the bar height, I’m going to go into my selection pane, and I’m going to go under the appearance category, all the way down to advance So, again, this is advance under the appearance section Now, here you’ll notice this drop down menu statistic, used to calculate bar The default is sum, which will be the sum of profits, but I’m going to use the drop down menu, and change that to the average, because, again, we’re interested in average profit figures I’d like to see the average value actually represented in my bar chart So I’m going to select the checkbox that says specify one statistical value to show for buyers And I’m going to go ahead and change that to the average Just to have a label there All right So now that I know how my columns will be used in this task, I’m going to focus on now customizing the look of this graph Let’s start by going to layout, under Appearance So by default, the bar chart is going to be a 2D bar chart I’ll go ahead and clear the checkbox, so that we have a 3D bar chart I can also change the shape here So instead of having it as blocks, let’s go ahead and change that to a cylinder I’ll make one last change, here, for the order of the bars Instead of the automatic order, let’s go with descending bar height All right That’s it for the overall shape, and look of those bars Let’s move on to another category I’m going to go into horizontal axis, and then the axis subcategory, underneath horizontal axis, here Now, here I am going to select the values tab And I’m going to play around with value rotation So the values that you actually see as labels, on that horizontal axis For the rotation, I’m going to put them at 45 degrees This will just make sure that the values fit nicely in our bar chart All right Continuing on with customizations I’m going to now move onto the vertical axis And I’m going to go to axis, under vertical axis Now for to label, again, my vertical axis is going to represent those profit values So I’m going to go ahead and type average profit That’ll be my axis label for the vertical axis, While we’re here, let’s go ahead and add in some reference lines, as well So under the vertical axis category, I’ll select Reference lines First I need to select a checkbox that says use reference lines And then I can actually change the style of the reference line So for the style, instead of a solid line, let’s go ahead and change that to dashed And for the color, instead of black, I’m going to go ahead and use a gray color I’ll go with gray 40% Last two things I’m going to use, again, something that we’ve seen in other tasks, is go ahead and changing our titles, and also modifying the task properties So I’ll select titles And let’s go ahead and clear to use default text checkbox, delete the title, and, I will call this, I’m gonna say, children product line I’ll do that on the first line And then I’ll come to a second line, and type average profit by product group So average profit by product group Let’s go ahead and change our footnote, as well So I select footnote, and clear use default text Go ahead and delete it Never get to go there Let’s go into the properties Go ahead and click Edit And for the label here, I’m going to go with Children Avg Profit/group So children Avg, for average, Profit/group And go ahead and click OK Now there are more customizations that you can make to the bar chart As you can see, there a lot of categories available in the selection pane But I just showed you some of the couple things that are pretty common, that we’d like to use when creating a bar charts So I’ll go ahead and click Run

And let’s take a look at our bar chart All right So looking at this bar chart, I have one bar for each product group And you might remember, I applied a value rotation to my label, so they’re at a 45 degree angle here, so that they fit nicely The bar height represents the average profit, which I did apply a label to, and I actually see the average profit value above each of my parts So that looks pretty good Now, one thing I’d like to show you is a project feature I did apply a filter to the data within a task So I’d like to make note of that filter and my project, just for documentation purposes So I’m going to go ahead and close this tab for the bar chart, and come into my lesson to process flow here I’m going to use something called the Note Field, to document the work that I did So to add a note, I’m going to go to File, New, and then select note This opens up a new no tab, and I can really type whatever I like here Going to go ahead and zoom in a little bit to make the text larger And I’m simply going to explain the filter So I’ll just say, this report includes products and the children product line So this report includes products in the children product line I’m going to continue to keep my good habit of renaming the different objects in my project So for this note, instead of just leaving the name at note, I’m going to click on this properties icon And let’s go ahead and just call this filter detail Going to click OK Changes a name And then I’m going to go ahead and close this note Now you actually see this note that I created, almost like a sticky note within my process flow here And so if you wanted to add a note, something that pertains to the entire project, you could leave your note like this But I’m going to make a couple more changes here First thing I’ll do, is I’ll click this down arrow, and select Collapse This will make this into an icon, just like all the other objects that are in my process flow Now this filter only really applies to this particular bar chart It does not apply to these other one way frequency reports that I created So I’d like to make the connection clear between the bar chart, and this filter So in order to create that link, what I’ll do is, I’m going to right click on the bar chart icon, select link to, and, in this link window, I’m going to go ahead and select that filter detail And click OK And now you see that my bar chart is tied to that filter detail So if anyone was looking at this project at a later point, they would be able to know that, oh, there’s a filter in the bar chart Take a double click on the note icon, and see more information about that So that’s how you create a bar chart, using the bar chart task As well as how you can filter data within a task, and even use notes in a project I’d like to show you another example of working with graphs and Enterprise Guide So in this scenario, Orion’s star would like to see the total salary by department, but they’d like to see this in a pie chart form So in this demonstration, I’ll show you how we can use the pie chart task to great pie charts, but I’m going to take it a step further I’m going to show you how we can further customize the look of our graph, by adding in just a little bit of SAS code to our task So here my Orion Star project I’ll be working with a lesson to process flow, again And I do want to work with the employee master table, which is already added into my project So no need to add it again, it’s already here So I’ll make sure to selected to make it active And then in the task pane, I’ve already expanded the graph category And, again, I have the pie chart task versus the pie chart wizard If you want to be able to quickly and easily add in some code to the task, then you would want to go with the task So I’m going to double click on a pie chart, to open up the pie chart task So the first thing I do is specify what type of pie chart I’d like I’m going to go with the default, which is just a simple pie Let’s move on to the data panel in the selection pane Now here, again, we’re going to specify our input table, any filters, and assign columns to task roles The first thing I’d like to do, is go ahead and filter the data little bit, just as we did before So I’ll click on Edit, and, in the edit data and filter window, I’m just going to quickly go ahead and exclude one of the departments So from the first drop down menu, I want to apply a filter to the department column cell

select department And, again, I just want to exclude one department, which is sales So from an operator, I’m going to go with not equal to And then I’ll go ahead and click on the value selected at three dots And from the list of departments, go ahead and click on the Sales department, and click OK And, again, this will just go ahead and omit the sales department from the analysis So let’s go ahead and click OK, and create that filter So, again, what I like to do in this scenario, is I want to look at the total salary by department So to call that I would like to chart would be, the department So let me take department, and drag it to the column to chart rule That means I’ll have a slice for each department at a Orion Star And then, again, I want that slice size feet representing the total salary So I’ll drag salary to these sum of role All right, so that looks good there for a data panel I’ve assigned my columns to task rules, and I’ve also assigned a filter, as well Next thing I’m going to do is, under the appearance section, I’m going to select Layout Then here I’m just going to customize the labels, and the placement of the labels, as well What I’d like to do is have the department name and the salary total outside of each slice, and then the percentage of the total salary, inside of each slice So for name, I already have that outside, that’s going to be the department name And for the statistic value, again, that’s already outside For the percentage, however, by default it is not selected I’m going to use the drop down menu, and go ahead and place it on the inside of my slices here All right Couple last things, as we always do Going to go to titles, go ahead and clear use default text And for my title here, I’m going to call it total salary by department So total salary by department And let’s go ahead and add a footnote, as well So going to select footnote in the section pane, clear to use default text checkbox And I’m just going to quickly explain to filter in the footnote this time So I’ll just say figures exclude the sales department So figures exclude the sales department Let’s go ahead and change a task label, as well So properties, edit And I’ll go ahead and change the label to depths salaries pie So department salaries pie/no sales Again, just indicating the Filter in the label as well So I’ll go ahead and click OK Let’s get this a run In here, we have our pie chart So again, each of the slices represents the department I have the total salary figure represented outside of the slice, along with the value or the department And the percentage that makes up of all of the salaries combined together, inside of my pie chart here This looks pretty good so far Now, there’s one more thing I’d like to do here to take this to the next level And, perhaps, I’d like to emphasize, the pie chart slice for the engineering department And emphasize it, I’d like to go ahead and explode or pop out this slice from the rest of the pie chart This is not something that I can do with an option that’s within a task, but all I need to do is add a tiny bit of code to the task itself, to be able to accomplish this So let’s go ahead and hop back into the task I’m going to click on modified task, on the task toolbar And, at the bottom, you’ll notice that there is a preview code button I’m going to go ahead and select on that button This opens up the code preview for task window, and as the name implies, it’s showing us the code that is generated behind the scenes Now, right now, I’m just able to view it But if I go ahead and select where it says Show custom code insertion points, in particular points throughout the code, I’m able to type in my own code And, again, just just gives me more flexibility to further customize the pie chart that I’m getting here All Right So here I’m going to go ahead and scroll through I’m looking for a particular insertion point I’m looking for the in graph options insertion point So I’m going to go ahead and scroll through a little bit And let’s go ahead and look for InGraphOptions insertion point Here we go And, as you can see, in the comment it says InGraphOptions I’m going to click where it says Insert custom code here, and I’m just going to type a little bit of code I’m going to use the explode equals option And in quotes, I’m going to type engineering What this explode equals option will do

is, it will go ahead and explode the slice for engineering And that’s the only code I have to add just a little bit here So let me go ahead and close this window Now let’s just give it one more run And there we have it Now we have the same pie chart But instead of it, able to explode the engineering pie chart slice So, again, tasks have a lot of options to be able to help customize the look of the graph that we’re creating But if you know a little bit of SAS code, then you could go in to the code for the task, add some code and predefined places, and you can further customize the results, like I did here So far in is tutorial, we’ve seen several different types of tasks And now I’d like to talk about customizing the task results Now what I mean by customizing now, is changing the output format With the task that we use, the default output format was HTML, meaning that the reports that we were creating were generated in the HTML format Well, we actually have a lot more options We can choose to generate our report in the SAS report format, Listing, which is the same as text, Excel, PDF, PowerPoint or RTF, which is word document So we have a lot of options, in terms of the type of formats that we can generate through our task We can even take this a step further, and control the look of these output formats, as well So what I mean by that is, with the different types of output formats that we generate, we can choose to apply a different type of style A style is going to control the color scheme of the results, the font that’s used Again, is just that overall look and feel So what I like to do with this activity, is show you where you can get a preview of the different type of styles we have available for you to choose from an Enterprise Guide So I’m going to hop into Enterprise Guide, here And to see the different types of output formats, or to styles that we can apply to output formats are, you can go to the Tools menu, and then select style manager Now you’ll see in the style list, that we have a listing of the different types of styles that we have We see their names listed here And in the style manager, you can simply click through these different style names, and get a preview of what the results would look like So for example, if we select festival, we see that there is a yellow color scheme, with a purple outline to it And on the other hand, let’s say something like journal, for example Looks more academic, with a more black and white feel to it So you can use the style manager to get a preview of the styles, before you actually apply them to your task results Even further, if you’d like, you can actually create your own styles, as well What I would recommend, is create a copy of one of the existing styles, and then go ahead and modify that style to whatever you’d like it to look like So keep the style manager on handy, so you can look to all the different styles that we have Now I’m going to go back to my slides here And let’s take this one step further Once we generate our output in different types of output formats, which you might want to do is to, actually, export those files And this is not just for our results, either Whenever we run a task, different types of output objects are generated We get code that is generated, which is SAS code A log is generated You may have some output data, and you may have your results, as well I will show you, in upcoming demonstration, how we can actually take all these different output objects, and then go ahead and export them to different types of files So for example, if you have an output table, maybe you like to export it as a CSV file or maybe even an Excel file We have a lot of options in order to customize the results that we have In this scenario, Orion Star, we’d like to make it easier to share their reports, by generating their reports and different output formats So in this demonstration, I’ll show you how we can modify the properties of a task, in order to generate our reports and different output formats And then we’ll also take a look at exporting our project items, as well So here I have the Orion Star project And from the lesson to process flow, I’d like to work with the products for category task that we worked with previously If I double click on products for category, we can see that on the Results tab, by default, our results were generated in the HTML format What I’d like to do, is go ahead and change this to generate our results and different types of output formats So to make that change, I’m going to click on Modify task, on the task toolbar In the one way frequencies task, I’m going to select on properties, and then go ahead and click Edit

Now, before in the Properties window, all we really did was change the task label But, this time, in the property selection pane, I’m going to go to where it says results Now again, the default is to generate the results in the HTML format, specifically with the HTML blue style applied to it To change that, I’m going to click on the button that says customize result format, styles, and behavior And now I can choose from all of these different types of formats For this demonstration, I’m going to select all of them So SAS report, Listing, Excel, PDF, PowerPoint and RTF I’m going to go with all of them You’ll notice on next to these output formats, there’s a drop down menu for the style I’m going to go ahead and make a couple of changes here So let’s say for SAS report, instead of the HTML blue style, I’m going to go with the meadow style, just so we can see what that looks like And then, for Excel, I’m going to change that to Dove Now, of course, you can change all of these other styles, as well, but I was going to change to show you what that looks like That’s it I’m going to go ahead and click OK And I’m going to give this a run And let’s take a look at our new results now It’s going to take just a second to run, because there are different types of output formats But now that it’s completed, take a look at our results tab Right now, I am still viewing the HTML results, by default But you’ll notice that under the Results tab, I have a lot of option now I have one tab for each output format that I have selected So to take a look at them, I simply need to double click on the corresponding tab So I’ll double click on SAS report, for example And here’s the SAS report result I did generate this using the meadow style, and we can see how that has affected, both the coloring and just the overall look of this report, here Now for a HTML SAS report and Listing, we can view those directly inside of Enterprise Guide before the others So Excel, PowerPoint, RTF, and PDF We need to view those in their respective applications So just to show you an example, if I double click on the Excel tab, the results will not open up inside of Enterprise Guide, but instead Microsoft Excel will open where I can actually view the results So I’ll zoom in a little bit here Here’s a result in Excel Again, I applied that Dove style I have one worksheet for to report And I have a separate worksheet, which contains the graph that I generated with the one way frequencies task I’ll go ahead and close out of Excel, here But Enterprise Guide makes it really easy I just said to me, I just need to make a small change to properties of a task, and now I can generate my output in All sorts of different output formats, here I’d like to point out one thing, though What I did here was, I changed a property of this specific task Specifically this products for category one way frequencies task So if I were to run a separate task, I would only see the default HTML results If you always want to generate a specific output format in all the tasks that you use, you can make a system change So to do that, and just really show you where that is, I’m going to go to the Tools menu at the top, and go to Options In the options window, I’m going to select Results, general And we’re going to take a look at the result formats pane Again, the default is just to generate HTML results But if you always want to generate your results in Excel, or PDF, for example, you can make those selections here In addition, if you want to customize those results, so maybe you want to always generate the results with a specific style, you can go to the subsection of that specific output format, and make those changes there So again, a lot of flexibility We were just focusing more on how do we change the output format for a particular task Which, again, if I close out of the options window, is within the properties of a particular task All right Let’s go ahead and take this one step further By changing the properties of a task, I’m able to view my results in these different output formats, but they haven’t been saved If I wanted to do that, I could go ahead and export my different result objects And, again, that includes the code, log, results, and output data There are several ways to do this If you click on the Share button, here is like share, and then select what it is that you want to share Is it the result? The output data? And then you can choose to go ahead and export that Another way to do this, is to use the tab for the specific item that you want to export To show you an example, I’m going to go with Excel So I’m going to right click where it says

Excel, products for category Select Share, here And what I’ll do is I’m going to go with an export Specifically, export as a step in project And I’ll show you what that means, when we’re done finishing exporting But let me select Export, as a step and project And, again, this will allow me to actually save this Excel file So step one on the expert wizard, is just making sure that the Excel file is what we want to export And so I’m going to go ahead and click Next Then step two, I can specify where I’d like to save this file So I’ll go ahead and click Browse And I’m going to go ahead and go to our course file location, here So I’m going to go in Let’s save it in this location And, for the name, I’m going to just shorten it a little bit, and call it product kept Go ahead and click Save Now, there’s this option at the bottom, that says overwrite existing output This is checked by default, which means, that if there already is an Excel workbook called product CAD I’m giving Enterprise Guide the permission to go ahead and overwrite that file If I clear this option, and a file with that name already exists, every time you perform the export, Enterprise Guide is going to append the date and time at the end So you can have a version history of all the exports that you’ve done So I’m going to go ahead and clear that option All right That’s it for step number two Click Next Step number three is just a confirmation We’re good to go So I’m going to go ahead and click Finish All right I see the log, and looks like this was successful So I’m going to go ahead and close the export file tab, and then also the products for category tab Taking a look at my process flow, I see that I generated my output formats in many different types of output formats But because I decided to export the Excel file, I see this extra export step Now, I’m really only seeing this, because I said not just export, but export as a step in the project So we actually see this represented as a step in the project And, what that means is, that if I were to run the contents of this process flow, or maybe even run the entire project, because the exporting is part of my project, it will automatically go ahead and export this file for me, as well We can take a look if I double click This is that product CAD Excel file that I actually exported I’ll be able to, actually, view that in Excel And, again, this is saved in a certain location all my computer All right Now looks good I’ll go ahead and close So you’ve seen how easy it is to generate our output formats in different types of file format, and even to export our different project items, as well So far in this tutorial, we have added different types of files to our project These include data or tables, and we’ve also added in some tasks as well Now what I’d like to talk about, is organizing the different contents of our project And I’d like to start by talking about how we can go about updating our results Why might you need to update your results? Well, maybe your input data has changed to a particular task, or maybe the input data has been updated to include more rows Whatever the reason may be, you may want to update the results that are in your project And you have several options for them If you like, in the project pane, you can click the green run arrow, and this will run the entire project, so everything that is in your project However, that may not be the most efficient way to update results, if you really only need to run a portion of your project So instead, what you can do is come to your process flow, and you’ll notice the run, but not the process flow toolbar When you click the down arrow next to run, you’ll notice that there are several different run options, that are available here I like to quickly talk about these So let me go back to my slides Let’s talk about those four different run options First thing I will mention, though, is the available run options will depend on the object that you have selected in that process flow But the available run options are going to include run selected items So if you have certain objects selected in the process flow, run selected items will only run those selected items Run process flow will run the entire process flow Run to selected item, will run the selected item and everything leading up to it And then run from selected item, or run deselect an item, and everything following it So although you could choose to run the entire project, and you may need to do that, you don’t necessarily have to You can just run a particular task You can run everything surrounding a certain task, or even run the entire process flow

So again, a lot of different options, when it comes to updating your results Now let’s say you choose to run the entire process flow If you have a lot of different objects in there, you might be wondering, in what order do these objects run? We’ll take a look here By default, your objects in the process flow, will execute order of top to bottom, and then left to right What that means is that objects that are closer to the top of the process flow, will run first And if they’re objects that are in the same horizontal position, objects that are to the left, are going to run before objects to the right In our example process flow here, the assigned project library wizard will run first, because it’s at the very top of the process flow Second will be the sample list SAS program, because the second highest object And then finally everything in this third last row will be executed Now let’s talk about these links here If you have objects that are linked together, whether they are automatic links that Enterprise Guide generated, or links that you define yourself, we saw an example earlier where we linked a note to a bar chart Either way you go about that, those links, they’re going to ensure a certain run order, meaning the links will run based on their dependencies, regardless of the positioning of the objects themselves So meaning, it will follow the direction of the arrow here So you can take advantage of this, to let’s say, place objects in your process flow in a certain order Or maybe link the objects in your process float in a certain order, as well Last thing I’d like to talk about, are several project organization recommendations First is something that we’ve been doing throughout this tutorial, is to use descriptive names This goes for our task labels This goes for our process flows And it also goes to our different output tables that we generate, as well Get in the habit of renaming those objects to something a little bit more descriptive and concise That way when your projects get larger, and you have a lot of items in them, you’re able to distinguish the different items Documenting details Take advantage of notes that we saw earlier, and you can choose to have them floating in your process flow, or you can link them to particular items, if they’re describing a particular item So definitely take advantage of that, as well The last two items arranging objects and using background colors, I’d like to actually show you that in Enterprise Guide So let me go into Enterprise Guide, here And I have my process flow By default, auto arrange is enabled And what that means is, that if I try to move objects around in the process flow, Enterprise Guide doesn’t really let me Out of range essentially optimizes to view the process flow, so Enterprise Guide determines where every object should go to If you would like to change that, you can right click anywhere in the process flow, and you can go ahead and clear the Auto Arrange option And now you’ll be able to move items freely within your process flow, so you have a lot more flexibility What I would recommend, is go ahead and turn auto arrange on Then Enterprise Guide optimize your process flow And then you can turn it off to make some small adjustments to the process flow I’ll go ahead and turn it back on The last recommendation is background color So in the same way I’m going to right click in the background of the process flow And then we have the background color option And we have several colors that we can use So I can use red, for example And I would recommend picking a different background color for each process flow, so that you have a visual distinction between your different process flows So those are a couple of project organization recommendations So far in is tutorial we’ve seen how we can use tasks and Enterprise Guide to help us analyze our data, and generate results And I mentioned before that, as you’re pointing and clicking your way through a task, behind the scenes Enterprise Guide is actually generating SAS code But that’s not the only way to generate SAS code If you’d like, you can choose to write out your own SAS code from scratch as, well To do this, you can simply open up a SAS program and Enterprise Guide, and start writing your own code Now Enterprise Guide, actually, makes coding a little bit easier, because it offers a lot of programming features Just to point out a couple of these You may want to take advantage of the format code feature, so the format code feature will add in line breaks, and indent certain statements And it’s just going to make your code a lot easier to look at, with just one click of a button There is the Integrated Syntax Help feature, so, as you are typing out your code, you will see a little snippets of the syntax documentation, so you can get some help with the syntax

There is the Autocomplete feature, so get as you’re typing up your code The Autocomplete feature will make suggestions on, maybe, some column names, or maybe some options or keywords that you might want to add into your program We have these Data Set Debugger Now the data step is mainly used to help manipulate your data And with a Data Step Debugger, you can execute the data step code line by line And this is really helpful if you have any logic errors in your program The Data Step Debugger can help you spot exactly where that logic error is occurring We have the Program Analyzer So the Program Analyzer allows you to identify different parts of your program, and see how each part is related to each other This is useful if you have grid computing available, and you’d like to take advantage of that Or to see if there’s any internalization issues with your code Finally we have the Program History, or Git Integration available, as well This is really useful to track or manage version control for yourself, or among multiple users So we’re going to take a look at some of the features that Enterprise Guide makes available, to make coding a little bit easier In this demonstration, I’d like to show you some of the features that are available in the Enterprise Guide program editor So we’ll focus on things like, how we can quickly format our code, how we can take advantage of the autocomplete and integrate a syntax help features, and also take a quick look at the data set debugger, as well Now, in Enterprise Guide I still have the Orion start project opened up And I can, actually, add programs to the project, just like I did with data and my task, as well However starting with Enterprise Guide 8.1, if I just want to write programs or open data, I can choose to do that without using a project So I just want to show you what that looks like I’m going to go ahead and close this project So I’ll go to the File menu, and select closed project So I’m completely outside of a project now, and I’m simply going to open up the program I’d like to work with So in the servers pane, I’ve already navigated to that folder And this program is eg3do1 And I’m just going to zoom in on the code, a little bit, so that it’s a little bit easier to see Now right off the bat, what you’ll notice is that this code is very difficult to look at It’s all squished together, and the formatting is not very consistent I could go ahead, and manually change the formatting However, there’s a much easier way to address this issue On the program editor toolbar, you’ll notice this button And if you hover over, it it’s called format code If you click on that, now we’ll go ahead and automatically format your entire program So we’ll add in some line breaks out logical points in your program, and also do some indenting, as well So again, a lot easier to look at the code that we have now So now that my code is a little bit easier to look at, let’s go ahead and run this entire program I’m going to click on the Run button on the program editor toolbar The code will be executed to SAS, and now we have our results Now, probably the first thing you notice is the layout of my tabs I have the code tab on the left hand side, and the log results and output data on the right hand side And you may like that, or you may want to change that As we saw earlier in this tutorial, tabs can be moved around freely within the interface, outside of the main application window, or even dock in predefined areas However, if you would like for there to be a certain default tab layout for all your SAS programs, you can set a certain option So if you go to the View menu, and go to program tab preset, you have several options The default is this vertical split, so the code tab on the left, and the log results and output data on the right I’m going to change this to standard, and this looks more familiar with what we had in our task So again, we have the code tab, the log tab, results, and output data, but they’re all together, instead of being split like it was by default All right So that’s getting the setup there Now let’s say you’re looking at this program, and you’re not very familiar with SAS code, so you’d like to know what some of these keywords actually mean Any of the words that are in a blue color, you can hover over them to get a quick snippet of the SAS documentation So for example here, if I hover over the If keyword, I see as it says it execute the SAS statement for observations that meet specific conditions I see a little syntax box, and I get quick links to the documentation, samples in SAS notes, and papers So pretty similar to the Help button that we saw in task, at any point, if you’re not sure what a certain keyword is doing, hover over it, and then we’ll go ahead and give you some more information

Let’s move on to another feature, which is the Data Step Debugger Now I do have a data step open in this program It goes from data in line, 3 all the way to run, on line 11 And I’d like to see how this data step that code is processing behind the scenes To do this, I need to enable the Data Step Debugger So on the program editor toolbar, I’m going to click on this button that says debug Has a little bug icon, here What happens is, now anywhere where there is data step code, you will see a green line in the margin, along with that bug icon Now to open up the Data Step Debugger, I can simply click on anywhere in that green line, or on the green button So I’ll go ahead and click on the bug, and here we have the Data Step Debugger And, again, I’m just going to zoom in on the code a little bit, so it’s a little bit easier to look at Now, what I can do is I can click on the step execution to next line button, and just execute the statement, one by one, and see how that’s affecting the values in our columns So for example, here, I’m going to go ahead and click on the step execution to next line button And it’s going to execute what is highlighted So this is the SET statement The SET statement is going to read in the very first row from my input table, which is employee addresses And I see those values represented on the right hand side Now we’re going to go into some conditional processing So what I’m doing here, is looking at the value of country, and then setting a value for country name Now if I look at the value of country for this first row, it is US So this first If statement is true So if I go ahead and execute it, it’s true So country name will be set to United States And we see that represented on the right hand side, here Now because I already met a true condition with this If statement, the else if, and the else statements, are entirely skipped over, and now we’re at the end of the data step I can repeat this process again This time with the second row from my input table So I click Next Execute as that statement Now we have new values, so this is the second row from our input table And we’re going to go through the conditional processing, again This time you’ll notice my country is AU So the first if statement is going to be false So if I go ahead and execute it, we move onto the next else if statement In this case country this is true, because it is AU, so country name will be assigned a value of Australia And, again, because we had a true statement, it’s going to skip over to else statement, and move onto the next iteration So you could go ahead and click through, line by line, to see what’s going on behind the scenes with the data stuff And again, this is really helpful when you have any logic errors in your program So that you can see, where exactly in your code, that logic error is occurring So just to show you, I’m going to go ahead and click on the running man button, here It’s going to go ahead and go finish your execution phase Debugging is now complete And I can go ahead and close out of the Data Step Debugger While I’m here, I’m also going to go ahead and click on that debug button, on the program editor toolbar, again And this will go ahead and suppress that green line and a bug that was on that margin So we kind of got an idea of what was going on behind the scenes, with that conditional processing I’ve already run this code, so I don’t need to run it again But if we take a look at our results tab, for example, we can see how the results turned out So again, the conditional processing said, if country is US, country name should be United States And if it’s AU, then the country name should be Australia And I see that that was properly done with my results, here All right Show you a couple other features I’m going to return to the code tab, now And now, what I’d like to do is add in a PROC MEANS step, to help calculate some summary statistics So I’m going to come to the end of my program And I’m going to take advantage of the autocomplete feature, to quickly type this PROC MEANS step So I’m going to go ahead and start by typing out the key word proc, so PR As soon as I do it, I see the autocomplete window pops up Proc is highlighted So because proc is highlighted, when I press these spacebar the keyword proc is added to my program, along with the space, as well I’m going to do the same thing for means So going to type me The word means is highlighted So when I pressed the spacebar, the word means is added to the program, along with a space, here Now, next, I see the autocomplete window popping up And here I’m seeing some valid options for a PROC MEANS

statement And, for example, there’s a data equals option When I hover over this option, I get quick information about it, which says it identifies the input SAS data set I’d like to go ahead and use it So I’m going to double click on data equals, to quickly add that into my program, here Next, I see a list of the libraries that I have assigned in my current Enterprise Guide session So I’m going to type in o That highlights the Orion table So I’m going to press the period key What this will do it will add an Orion, along with the period And then, finally, I want to work with the employee master tables So I’ll double click employee master, from the autocomplete window Let’s keep going with this I’m going to go ahead and hit the spacebar, and, again, I see those valid options for a PROC MEANS statement, in here I’m going to go ahead and take advantage of autocomplete, and go ahead and type in a couple of options, here So I’m going to type in mean, I’m going to type in min, max And I’m also going to see max this equals option, and set that equal to 2 I have to fully type all that out I just took advantage of autocomplete, and let autocomplete fill in all the details for me All right Let’s move on to the next line, here And I’m going to tab over, just to keep the formatting consistent And I’m going to use a var statement Now, the var statement is where I specify which numeric columns I’d like to analyze, or get summary statistics for And as soon as I type var, I actually see a listing of all the numeric columns in my input table So I’d like to analyze salary, I’m going to type in S, that highlights salary, and I’m going to go and, actually, type in a semicolon What this will do, it’s going to add in the highlighted keyword salary, and it’s going to go ahead and end that statement with a semicolon Again, I’m going to just continue on with autocomplete, and go ahead and add in a couple of more words, here I’m going to use a class statement, to go ahead and group my results by department And then, at the very bottom, I’m going to add a run statement to end the PROC MEANS step Now, I really enjoy using the integrated syntax help and autocomplete features, but if you would like to turn those off, there is a way that you can do that At the very top, you’ll want to go to program, and go ahead and select on editor options Now, here you want to go to the autocomplete tab, and you can go ahead and clear the enable autocomplete, or enable integrated syntax help checkboxes, to go ahead and turn those off There’s a lot of other options you can set in this enhance editor options window, like, for example, changing how the formatting code feature works, or the indenting, for example And you can even change the appearance of your SAS programs, and log files as well So a lot of options you can set, here I’m going to keep everything as it is, just want to show you where to find out So I’ll go ahead and click Cancel, and return back to my program Now, I’ve already run everything in this program, except for the PROC MEANS So if I’d like to run just a portion of my code, what I can do is highlight the portion I’d like to run, which in this case is PROC MEANS, and then click the Run button Another short cut you can use is the F3 key on your keyboard That works as well So click Run That is going to run only the highlighted portion So I don’t see the results from before I only see the results for the current portion that I ran, which is the PROC MEANS step So my results are updated, my output data is updated I didn’t generate any output data, so I don’t see that there And my log is updated, as well Turned to my code Again, those are just some of the features that we have available, in terms of programming in Enterprise Guide, so definitely take advantage of them to make programming just a little bit easier Before I finish, I’m going to go ahead and save this program, and we’re good to go We are at the very end of your tutorial on getting started with SAS Enterprise Guide, and I hope you found it very helpful Just to recap, we saw how we can add data to our project, including importing different types of data files, like Microsoft Excel, and CSV files And then we saw how we could prepare this data using a robust Query Builder Then we talked about analyzing our data, using different types of tasks, including the one way frequencies, bar chart, and the pie chart task We then took a look at a couple of project features, that help us customize our project results

And also organize the contents of our project, as well Finally, we took a look at some of the available programming features in Enterprise Guide, to help make coding just a little bit easier Here, I’d like to end up with a couple of resources that might be of interest to you If you’d like to learn more about other Enterprise Guide tasks, and some other project features that are available, you may want to take our SAS Enterprise Guide 1, Querying and Reporting course, or our SAS Enterprise Guide 2, Advanced Tasks and Querying Course Now I’ve pointed out some of the programming features we have in Enterprise Guide, but we didn’t really go into the syntax portion So if you’re interested in that, I would recommend watching this video on writing a basic SAS program, or taking our SAS programming 1, essentials course Finally if you’d like to connect with other SAS users, you can join a SAS community There is one that’s specific to Enterprise Guide, or you can follow our blog Some of my favorites are the SAS Dummy Blog, and also the SAS Users Blog So again, thank you so much for joining me in this tutorial, and I hope you found it helpful